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Jeff Loomis & Keith Merrow demonstrate Bias Desktop by Positive Grid

Guitar Noize - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 14:16


Jeff Loomis and Keith Merrow recently teamed up to create an exciting new instrumental Metal band called Conquering Dystopia which they are having a lot of success with, and rightly so!

In this video Keith & Jeff amp matched the original amp tones from Conquering Dystopia using Positive Grid’s new Bias Desktop plugin (check out my full review here) with amazing results.

“The amp matched tones were professionally engineered in Keith’s studio using the same mics and cabs used on the album. Jeff and Keith amp matching presets will soon be available for download on ToneCloud.”

The amp:
• Peavey 5150 (Signature) head, tube modded

The cab:
• Modded Randall ISO with 1×12 Vintage 30, upgraded baffling (Aurelex).
• Cab mic’d with Shure SM-57 (off-axis)

The post Jeff Loomis & Keith Merrow demonstrate Bias Desktop by Positive Grid appeared first on Guitar Noize.

Categories: General Interest

1960s Migma Favorit hollowbody teardrop electric from Germany

Guitarz - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 12:27
guitarz.blogspot.com:
Here's an intriguing German-made guiar currently listed on reverb.com with a Buy It Now price of US $1,400 + shipping. It's a Migma Favorit, according to listing made by Heinz Seifert (?) if I am reading that correctly. It's supposedly from 1960, in which case it would have pre-dated the Vox Mark IV (a.k.a. Teardrop) by three years. I guess the shape might have been based on that of a lute - it would seem to be the obvious genesis for this design.

The example being sold here is obviously missing a pickguard, which would have hidden the enlarged part of the lower f-hole. I'm guessing it was made that way as an easier way of getting the pots in place during assembly. And just to prove that this is a playable guitar, here's a video of Linas Pečiūra playing "Corcovado" on this very instrument.



G L Wilson

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Categories: General Interest

Questions from students, Part 2

Cape Cod Acoustics - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 10:53
Continuing the theme of my previous post, here are more of the most common questions I hear from students.

6.  How long should I practice?

Well, as long and as often as you can! Always remember that in the purest sense, playing the guitar is a form of exercise and like any exercise, doing a moderate amount on a frequent basis is much more effective than trying to do a lot on an infrequent basis. With adult students I hardly ever see cases of slacking off from practice for no good reason, which can be a problem with younger students. The problem for adults is more a question of available time. None of us have enough of that! If possible, try to set a regular time each day to devote to practice. This will keep it in the forefront of your mind, priority-wise. Although the actual amount of time per practice session will vary, I encourage my students to put in at least a half-hour per day; more is better of course. Some adult students whose schedule allows find that playing for 15 or 20 minutes a couple times a day is much more effective and productive than trying to put in a half hour once a day.

7.  Is it OK if I try some songs I find on guitar web sites?

Absolutely! I firmly believe that if a student is playing (just about anything) it can only help their playing overall. Practicing what I give for a weekly lesson is required but hey, there’s no harm in doing exploring! There is an absolute wealth of music out there in cyberspace and from my perspective as a guitar teacher, students who find examples of songs they like and then try to play them actually makes my job easier. This is because trying songs on their own always inspires students to ask important questions about technique and song construction. Just keep in mind that there is wide variation in the accuracy of the music you’ll find online. But we can fix that – ha!

8.   I really only like/listen to one kind of music and that’s all I’m interested in playing. How soon can we get into that?

One of the reasons I don’t use any single guitar method is that I try very hard to get my students into the type of music they like as soon as possible. I use pieces of many different established methods because there is no such thing as a “one size fits all” guitar course. However, it’s important to remember that ALL music has some very basic concepts that must be addressed before you can play like your favorite performers, things like keeping a steady beat and hearing what’s right (and wrong) with your playing. The first thing I work on with all my students, regardless of their experience are rhythmic concepts. Without the ability to keep a steady beat, even the simplest songs will not be satisfying. Don’t worry though – I can use just about any type of music to demonstrate these concepts. So we most definitely will use songs you know and like to conquer these things. I carefully plan each and every lesson for every student. I want you to enjoy what you’re practicing. All I ask is that students keep an open mind. In almost every case, students’ tastes in music change as they progress. Discovering new music and artists is one of the joys of playing the guitar.

9.  Are there any devices I can use to strengthen my hands when I can’t be playing?

I hear this one more often than you might imagine. Some players have reported success with using a small playground ball known as a “Pinkie.” These small balls are made of a foam rubber type material and are about the size of a tennis ball but have more “give” than one of those, so it’s fairly easy to squeeze and release them. There are also a number of devices marketed for guitarists for strengthening purposes, which have small push pads and springs that offer resistance when pressed down. I’m not sure if they work as I’ve never tried one. The fact is, nothing exactly replicates actually pressing down on the strings so I tell my students that playing is best exercise when you come right down to it. But a Pinkie or one of those exercise contraptions probably can’t hurt, so if you’re inclined to get one and use it while you’re watching TV, go for it.

10.  I’ve been playing a while and I can play some songs but I wan to take things to the next level. What’s the best way to do that?

Many answers here, but I think the single best thing you can do to advance is make the effort to play with others. Making your playing match what another player is doing is the best way I know to advance your progress. Forcing yourself to listen to what others are playing while you also listen to your own playing hones your rhythmic sense and awareness of tonality. Plus – and this is the most important thing – it’s fun!! And isn’t that what you were hoping for when you decided to play in the first place?

Peace & good music,

Gene

Categories: Acoustics

Martin Ambassadors Featured On Acoustic Sessions

The Martin Guitar Blog - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 10:20

Acoustic Guitar has featured a slew of #MartinPride in their Acoustic Sessions lately.

 
Martin Ambassador Valerie June kicked off the Martin takeover with her 000-15M and songs from her album Pushin' Against A Stone. Martin Ambassador Seth Avett followed with an acoustic version of  "Souls Like Wheels." The latest Acoustic Session comes from Martin Ambassador Ed Sheeran who performs his current single "Thinking Out Loud." Ed Sheeran can also be found on the cover of the December issue of Acoustic Guitar

To watch all the Acoustic Sessions, click here.
Categories: Manufacturers

Always great to hang with Jimmy. #widespreadpanic

Jason Shadrick - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 09:53

via Instagram http://ift.tt/1u7QiNO
Categories: General Interest

New PRS All-Mahogany S2 Models

Guitar Noize - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 04:39

prs s2 mahogany
PRS have added 3 new guitars to their mid-priced, made in Maryland US, S2 range. Previously PRS boosted the range with 3 slick looking semi-hollow models which made the total up to 8 and the new all mahogany S2 models pushes that number up to 11, so clearly PRS feel that this is an important price bracket.

Here is more info from PRS about these new guitars:

Weeks before announcing their 2015 line up, PRS Guitars is introducing three new all-mahogany S2 Series guitars: the S2 Standard 24, S2 Standard 22, and S2 Singlecut Standard. These guitars feature the subtle aesthetic of mahogany and pickguard-mounted electronics for a vintage vibe with modern versatility and playability that is perfect for the gigging musician. All three models have solid mahogany bodies, set mahogany necks, versatile electronics, and tried-and-true PRS quality.

Known for its warm, woody tone, mahogany provides the S2 Standard models with a strong fundamental that has been built on to create guitars that play as well and sound as good plugged straight into an amp or run through a modern pedalboard setup. The set neck adds to the tone of these guitars by providing remarkable resonance and lasting sustain while the addition of PRS-designed pickups and push/pull tone controls gives players access to authentic singlecoil sounds in addition to strong, punchy humbucker tones.

The only 24-fret model in the lineup, the Standard 24 is a classic PRS reimaged for players who prefer a stripped-down approach to their music. The Standard 22 goes in a more vintage direction, but remains a bare-bones workhorse for the player who needs to cover a lot of ground with their music. The Singlecut Standard boasts a classic body shape and control layout, with volume and tone controls for each pickup and a 3-way toggle pickup switch on the upper bout, giving players plenty of options to dial in flawless tone.

As with all S2 Series guitars, the Standard models feature S2 locking tuners, PRS-designed bridges, as well as PRS nuts, frets, and strings. This means PRS fit, finish, and attention to detail all at a more affordable price. With solid build quality and versatile electronics platform, the S2 Standard lineup can effortlessly go from high gain punk and metal to low, bassy blues, making these guitars a solid choice for players who prefer a straightforward approach to a variety of different musical styles.

For full specifications and to see the rest of the S2 Series, visit www.prsguitars.com.

The post New PRS All-Mahogany S2 Models appeared first on Guitar Noize.

Categories: General Interest

Truth #widespreadpanic

Jason Shadrick - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 23:14

via Instagram http://ift.tt/1tguCLT
Categories: General Interest

Slayer’s Tom Araya Visits ESP

I Heart Guitar - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 13:21

Categories: General Interest

PRS Adds Three All-Mahogany “S2 Standard” Models to Line Up

Guitar International - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 10:25

Press Release

Source: PRS Guitars

PRSStandardsWeeks before announcing their 2015 line up, PRS Guitars is introducing three new all-mahogany S2 Series guitars: the S2 Standard 24, S2 Standard 22, and S2 Singlecut Standard.

The original PRS Standard, introduced in 1987, evolved from Paul Reed Smith’s Pre-Factory all-mahogany instruments.

Reimagined for the S2 Series, these guitars feature the subtle aesthetic of mahogany and pickguard-mounted electronics for a vintage vibe with modern versatility and playability that is perfect for the gigging musician. All three models have solid mahogany bodies, set mahogany necks, versatile electronics, and tried-and-true PRS quality.

Known for its warm, woody tone, mahogany provides the S2 Standard models with a strong fundamental that has been built on to create guitars that play as well and sound as good plugged straight into an amp or run through a modern pedalboard setup. The set neck adds to the tone of these guitars by providing remarkable resonance and lasting sustain while the addition of PRS-designed pickups and push/pull tone controls gives players access to authentic singlecoil sounds in addition to strong, punchy humbucker tones.

The only 24-fret model in the lineup, the Standard 24 is a classic PRS reimaged for players who prefer a stripped-down approach to their music. The Standard 22 goes in a more vintage direction, but remains a bare-bones workhorse for the player who needs to cover a lot of ground with their music.

The Singlecut Standard boasts a classic body shape and control layout, with volume and tone controls for each pickup and a 3-way toggle pickup switch on the upper bout, giving payers plenty of options to dial in flawless tone.

As with all S2 Series guitars, the Standard models feature S2 locking tuners, PRS-designed bridges, as well as PRS nuts, frets, and strings.

This means PRS fit, finish, and attention to detail all at a more affordable price. With solid build quality and versatile electronics platform, the S2 Standard lineup can effortlessly go from high gain punk and metal to low, bassy blues, making these guitars a solid choice for players who prefer a straightforward approach to a variety of different musical styles.

For full specifications and to see the rest of the S2 Series, visit www.prsguitars.com

About PRS Guitars:
Paul Reed Smith Guitars is a leading manufacturer of high quality instruments in Stevensville, Maryland, and has provided some of the world’s most renowned musicians with instruments since 1985. The PRS team of highly skilled craftspeople design and build a wide variety of musical instruments and gear for worldwide distribution, including electric, acoustic, and bass guitars as well as boutique-style guitar amplifiers. The PRS SE line of products complements the Maryland-made PRS line by offering highly approachable and more affordable electric, acoustic, and bass guitars. Carlos Santana, Neal Schon, John McLaughlin, Linkin Park, Orianthi, Opeth, Zach Myers of Shinedown, Mark Tremonti of Creed and Alter Bridge, Ricky Skaggs, Cody Kilby, Martin Simpson, Tony McManus, Warren Haynes, and Derek Trucks are among the artists currently playing PRS instruments and/or amplifiers.

PRS Guitars Info: www.prsguitars.com

Categories: Classical

Stan Jay

Guitarist.com - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:18

Stan M. Jay, owner of the Mandolin Brothers musical instrument store on Staten Island, which has been a pilgrimage destination for recording stars, collectors and other connoisseurs of the guitar, mandolin, banjo and ukulele for more than 40 years, died on Wednesday in Staten Island. He was 71.

The cause was Mantle cell lymphoma, his wife, Bea, said.

Mr. Jay played a virtuoso behind-the-scenes role in the musical lives of performers such as Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Buffett and Paul Simon — not as a performer, but as one of the country’s premier dealers and restorers of new and vintage fretted instruments.

The walls of his office at Mandolin Brothers, located in a tiny commercial strip, were papered with snapshots of him with those musicians and others, a collage of a Woodstock that might have been: Bruce Springsteen, Judy Collins, Lenny Kravitz, Sarah McLachlan, Sheryl Crow and Crosby, Stills and Nash, as well as celebrity guitar connoisseurs like Conan O’Brien and the filmmaker Christopher Guest.

The rest here.

Categories: Classical

1965 J-45 The Donovan Model

Gibson Acoustic Instruments - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:14
1965 J-45 The Donovan Model A thin, naturally cured, nitrocellulose finish and matte, textured appearance recreates the look and sound of the original. Each guitar features an autographed label and personal letter from Donovan.
Categories: Manufacturers

Songwriter Deluxe Studio EC

Gibson Acoustic Instruments - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:13
Songwriter Deluxe Studio EC At the heart of Gibson’s square-shoulder dreadnought line of acoustic guitars is the Songwriter series, and the Songwriter Deluxe Studio EC is its most fundamental offering in a distinct cutaway design. First introduced in 2003, the Songwriter Deluxe Studio EC combines Gibson’s time-honored bracing patterns of the 1930s with our original dreadnought shape, and it has gained worldwide acclaim over the past decade.
Categories: Manufacturers

Songwriter Deluxe Studio

Gibson Acoustic Instruments - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:13
Songwriter Deluxe Studio At the heart of Gibson’s square-shoulder dreadnought line of acoustic guitars is the Songwriter series, and the Songwriter Deluxe Studio is its most fundamental offering. First introduced in 2003, the Songwriter Deluxe Studio combines Gibson’s time-honored bracing patterns of the 1930s with our original dreadnought shape, and it has gained worldwide acclaim over the past decade.
Categories: Manufacturers

J-45 Custom

Gibson Acoustic Instruments - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:13
J-45 Custom Without question, the J-45 is one of the most beloved acoustic guitars in the history of modern music, and the icon of Gibson's round-shoulder dreadnought acoustic line since its introduction in 1942. The J-45 Custom is a celebration of the original. Combining vintage appointments with several modern features, the J-45 Custom delivers the renowned tone of classic J-45s, while adding refined finishes that complement its fundamental design, including a new floral abalone and mother-of-pearl hea...
Categories: Manufacturers

J-45 Standard

Gibson Acoustic Instruments - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 06:13
J-45 Standard The J-45 is one of Gibson’s best-selling acoustics of all time. Nicknamed “The Workhorse” and first introduced in 1942, this popular acoustic is now the icon of its round-shoulder, dreadnought line. World renowned for its full, balanced expression, warm bass and excellent projection, the J-45 is one of most technically advanced guitars of its time. Available for a limited time in a deep wine red finish.
Categories: Manufacturers

Spooky Songs for Halloween

Guitar Noise - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 05:40

It’s crazy how much some people look forward to Halloween. Here's a quick selection of spooky rock songs that are overlooked for the rest of year.

This first appeared on Guitar Noise. © 2014.

Categories: Learning and Lessons

Interview: Nili Brosh

Guitar Noize - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 13:50

nili-brosh-a-matter-of-perception
Nili Brosh has just released her second debut album, ‘A Matter Of Perception‘, an incredible instrumental guitar record featuring world class musicians that illustrates just how far she has come since her Berklee College days. I caught up with Nili while she had some downtime from her hectic schedule touring as guitarist in the Tony MacAlpine band to chat about ‘A Matter Of Perception‘.

GN: A lot has happened since the release of your debut album including touring extensively with Tony MacAlpine, how has this influenced your writing and playing for this record?

NB: I’m not sure how much it influenced the writing, because a great deal of it was actually done several years ago when I had just first met Tony… but I can tell you that the extensive touring, in addition to playing with so many high-caliber musicians has greatly improved my playing for sure. It’s hard to tell where my playing would’ve been today without the push that playing with Tony has given me, and I don’t even really want to think about it! I just know that it pushed me to a much higher level than I was at before, and I think it’s definitely audible in the difference between my first record (“Through The Looking Glass“) and my new one.

GN: You have also moved to 7 string guitar as your main instrument a while ago do you still play 6 string guitars?

NB: I actually don’t! I don’t even have any 6 string guitars in LA with me – they’re all left back at my parents’ house in Boston, nor do I own any 6 string Ibanez guitars to begin with. To be honest, since having switched to the 7 several years ago, I find it very difficult to play a 6. I always find myself trying to play lines that make their way down to a string that ends up not being there! Having the low B there has just become a very natural part of my playing now. However, when I do pick up a 6 string, I notice how much smaller the neck is, and it makes my hands feel like a giant’s! That part is cool in a silly kind of way… my hands are really not very big.

GN: So I assume all of the new tracks were written on a 7?

NB: Some of them were, some of there weren’t. As I said, much of the writing was done right around the time I met Tony and picked up a 7 string in the first place. However, the songs that weren’t written on a 7 evolved and were adapted to be played on one over time. I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be able to play any of them on a 6 now…

GN: You’ve also recently switched to EMG pickups, were these used on the record?

NB: They were used on one song, I signed with EMG in January of this year, and most of the album was actually recorded during the summer of 2013. You can, however, hear my 57-66 EMG pickups on the song Yolanda, and on the live performance of Silence of Saturday and A Matter of Perception at EMGtv.

GN: What other gear was used on the new record?

NB: I mostly used my main rig, a Peavey JSX head with an Egnater Tourmaster 2×12 cabinet recorded with a variety of microphones. I take a very simple approach when it comes to guitar recording – I’ve always been pretty old-school as far as the “put the mic in front of the cab until you get a good tone” method goes. With the right mic’s and the right room, I believe it can work.

GN: You mentioned that these tracks were actually written a while ago, did you feel you needed to live with them for a while before committing to tape so to speak?

NB: Absolutely. The songs were in fact written (as far as a basic melody line and chord changes are concerned) a long time ago, but I wasn’t very happy with them until… pretty much the end of the recording process! I felt as though much rehashing and reworking on the lines and arrangements was necessary to really get these songs to come alive. It took a long time and it was a challenging creative process at times, but I’m very glad I took the time to go through it, because it can be extremely rewarding to go from the point of frustration to the point where you’re truly happy with the material. Not to mention, it makes it a lot more desirable to share it with the public at that point.

GN: The track Eli I immediately picked up on being a tribute to Jason Becker (Eli being his middle name), but interestingly the DLR era Becker (my favourite Becker material). Was this your “It’s Showtime!”?

NB: Yup – sure is! Good catch on your part! I’m not sure how many other people may have picked up on this, but it might have been a bit more obvious to people who have seen my “It’s Showtime!” YouTube cover from a few years back. The DLR era Becker is my favorite material of his too, and – as many others have done before me – I figured what better way to pay tribute to one of the greatests ever than writing an instrumental in the style of one of my favorite songs?

GN: You have some amazing musicians playing with you on this album such as Bryan Beller, Marco Minnemann and Virgil Donati. Have you played with any of these guys before?

NB: I have, in fact. Marco played a few songs on Tony MacAlpine’s last album (self-titled, 2011), and therefore he was the drummer on my very first gig with him, in July 2011. A few months later I was invited to sit in with The Aristocrats at their performance at Berklee College of Music, on a song Bryan wrote called “Cave Dweller” (you can see footage and hear Bryan talk about it in his interview in my album documentary – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydyqMhSDB0A). That experience, as you might imagine, was one of the most memorable and exhilarating musical experiences I’ve ever had. As far as Virgil goes, we actually have a slightly longer history – I joined a band with him and Tony called Seven The Hardway in the beginning of 2011, and we’d rehearsed extensively but had never actually toured. So Virgil and I since joke about how we’ve played together so much, but have never played together. Soon, hopefully, we will get an opportunity.

GN: So were the tunes fully written when you had them record their parts?

NB: The basic ideas were all there, yes. Of course, the guys enhanced my demo rhythm section ideas greatly, which was my reasoning for hiring them. I knew how much these virtuosos had to bring to the table, obviously, and I wanted to use it as inspiration to rework the material and take it to the next level.
I gave all the players early demos of the material in the anticipation of wanting to hear what they give back to me and feed off of it before finalizing my parts. I looked at it as an opportunity to grow and collaborate as best I can without actually being in the same room with any of them. I knew that this was an incredible learning opportunity, and the key to making this record the best it could possibly be. In other words… these songs could’ve never been where they are today without these guys.

GN: The final track Yolanda reminded me of Andy Timmons but a little more jazzy, was this tune influenced by any guitarist in particular?

NB: Surprisingly enough, I can’t say that I can pinpoint it to any particular player. Yolanda is actually the oldest song on the record – I wrote it around 2008-2009, when I was still going to Berklee College of Music. I remember being slightly surprised at the time that I had come up with those ideas – being as they’re so different from what I usually write. My guess is it probably came about from the exposure my ears had to a lot of jazz at school back then.

GN: You have always been an extremely proficient guitar player but it does seem that since your time touring alongside Tony MacAlpine you have really developed technically and musically, do you feel that in yourself?

NB: Thank you! And yes, absolutely. Oddly enough, I have somewhat recently revisited a bunch of old videos of mine, an activity which usually results in a mixed bag of emotions for me: amusement, delight, embarrassment, searing pain… anyway, this coincidental, educational trip down memory lane led me to the conclusion that the year I met Tony, my playing clearly transformed completely. I don’t know if anyone else knows my playing well enough to be able to pinpoint it down to those particular few months, but to me it was very obvious. As I’ve mentioned earlier, It’s incredibly scary for me to wonder where my playing would have been today had I never had the great privilege of learning from him. I’m very lucky that things worked out the way they did.

NB: So what is next for you? Any Nili Brosh solo tour dates in the pipeline?

NB: Actually, yes! I’ve recently put together a band to play my solo material with for the first time since my first CD release party, FOUR years ago! We’re starting with some shows in California:

December 10th, 2014 at The Baked Potato in Los Angeles
December 11th, 2014 opening for Maragold at M15 in Corona, CA
December 13th, 2014 opening for Maragold at Ramona Mainstage in Ramona, CA

I will be posting more dates periodically as they come up, so I hope you keep in touch with me through my social media!

You can follow Nili Brosh on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube and of course you can also keep track of her latest news, tour dates etc. on her website – http://www.nilibrosh.com/.

To purchase ‘A Matter Of Perception’ go to the Nili Brosh online store – http://nilibrosh.spinshop.com/.

Check out The Story Of A Matter Of Perception on Nili’s YouTube Channel:
Part 1
Part 2

The post Interview: Nili Brosh appeared first on Guitar Noize.

Categories: General Interest

Extraordinary Music Memorabilia from the World’s Greatest Musical Artists of All Time to be Auctioned

Guitar International - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 12:39

Press Release

Source: M2MPR

bonogretsch

Bono’s Gretsch

Julien’s Auctions, the world’s premier music and entertainment memorabilia auction house has announced the highly anticipated Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll auction event to take place on Friday, November 7 and Saturday, November 8, 2014 at Julien’s Auctions Beverly Hills gallery located at 9665 Wilshire Blvd.

The auction will feature hundreds of items from the life and careers of some of music’s biggest artists including The Beatles, U2, Chris Martin, The Grateful Dead, Elvis Presley, Madonna, Todd Rundgren, Johnny Cash, Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, Todd Rundgren, Kurt Cobain, Heart, Mick Jagger, James Brown, Rihanna, Lady Gaga, Cher, Prince, Michael Jackson, Miles Davis and even a bit of Liberace and many more.

Highlights of the Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll event include an impressive collection of rare and stage/studio used guitars that are worthy of a Grammy Award winning performance.

todditaliaThe collection includes Bono’s signed and played “Irish Falcon” Gretsch guitar (Estimate: $20,000-$30,000), U2’s the Edge studio used guitar (Estimate: $60,000-$80,000), Chris Martin stage played guitar (Estimate: $6,000-$8,000), a Todd Rundgren stage played Italia guitar (Estimate: $600-$800), Stephen Stills Gibson J200 Guitar (Estimate: $18,000-$20,000), David Bowie’s stage used Takamine 12-string guiar (Estimate: $20,000-$30,000), a set of three John Lennon Inspired limited edition J-160E Gibson guitars (Estimate: $20,000-$30,000), a Prince Love Symbol guitar (Estimate: $10,000-$15,000), Elvis Presley’s NBN stage used acoustic guitar (Estimate: $30,000-$40,000) and many more.

Other auction highlights include the Collection of Ann & Nancy Wilson of the mega-rock-band Heart, The Collection of Madonna and The Collection of Naomi Judd.  In addition the Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll will offer collectors the chance to own a piece of rock n’ roll history as Julien’s Auctions offers items including an Alton Kelly Mickey Hart “Rolling Thunder” Grateful Dead cover art  (Estimate: $8,000-$10,000 ), Todd Rundgren’s original album figural art (Estimate: $100-$300), Rick Griffin Adventure of Griffin and Stoner cartoon (Estimate $200-$400), John Cash handwritten lyrics (Estimate: $800-$1,200), Led Zeppelin signed Led Zeppelin vinyl cover (Estimate: $12,000-$14,000), Jimi Hendrix Gered Mankowitz print ($5,000-$7,000), a Kurt Cobain stage worn shirt (Estimate: $3,000-$5,000), Mick Jagger’s performance production files (Estimate: $4,000-$6,000 ), Mile Davis Maxfield Custom leather motorcycle jacket (Estimate: $5,000-$7,000) and the Godfather of Soul James Brown’s red sequined cape (Estimate: $3,000-$5,000).

brownguitar

Chris Martin’s acoustic

Beatles memorabilia to be offered includes a Beatles signed receipt (Estimate:$8,000-$10,000 ), a Beatles “Diana Dors” wax bust from Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hears Club Band album cover (Estimate: $50,000-$70,000), a Beatles signed Valex image (Estimate: $12,000-$15,000), John Lennon’s spectacles ($20,000-$40,000) and a signed John Lennon and Yoko Ono calendar ($4,000-$6,000).  Many other items from the Fab Four will be offered during the two day rock n’ roll auction event.

Edge's Gretsch

Edge’s Gretsch

From the flamboyant entertainer Liberace to King of Pop himself, the Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll auction will also include a collection of items befitting of rock royalty. These highlights include Liberace’s “Stars & Stripes” ensemble ($6,000-$8,000), Whitney Houston’s stage worn cat suit (Estimate: $2,000-$3,000), Michael Jackson’s Breakaway jumpsuit (Estimate: $8,000-$10,000), a Michael Jackson video worn jacket (Estimate:$10,000-$15,000), a Michael Jackson “Dangerous” tour costume (Estimate: $10,000-$15,000), Lady Gaga’s Harper Bazaar worn sunglasses ($8,000-$10,000), Rihanna’s stage worn ensemble (Estimate: $2,000-$4,000), Frank Sinatra’s signed “Witchcraft” lithograph (Estimate: $1,500-$2,00), an Elvis Presley Bomber Jacket (Estimate: $6,000-$8,000), Elvis Presley’s TCB eyeglasses ($8,000-$12,000), an Elvis Presley gifted ring (Estimate: $16,000-$18,000), an Elvis Presley overcoat (Estimate: $15,000-$20,000) and an Elvis Presley white Deerskin North leather ensemble (Estimate: $30,000-$40,000).

Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll Auction Public Exhibition

Includes the “Ladies Who Rock” Exhibition

Monday, November 3, 2014 through Friday, November 7, 2014

10am -5pm daily

Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll Auction

Friday, November 7, 2014 – Begins at 10am

Saturday, November 8, 2014 – Begins at 10am

Registering to Bid

Registration is required to bid in this live auction and can be done in person at the exhibition and auction, or online before the sale at the JuliensAuctions.com Registration page to bid by phone, proxy or in person, or online at JuliensLive.com to bid live online, or by calling (310) 836-1818.

Placing Bids

There are four ways to bid in this sale:

  1. Bid through Julien’s Auctions Online Live in Real Time at JuliensLive.com.
  2. Place bids in the room by attending the auction.
  3. Bid over the telephone through an auction house representative, who sits in the room and conveys the bid to the auctioneer.
  4. Enter Absentee bids. Absentee bid forms are included in the back of each catalogue, and are also available by calling Julien’s Auctions or online at www.juliensauctions.com.

ABOUT  JULIEN’S  AUCTIONS:
With expertise specializing in entertainment and music memorabilia, Julien’s Auctions has quickly established itself as the auction house to the stars. Julien’s Auctions presents exciting, professionally managed and extremely successful auctions with full color high quality auction catalogues unlike any other auction company and stars in the network primetime television series “Celebrity Home Raiders.” With media coverage spanning the globe and unprecedented marketing support, Julien’s Auctions has become known as the premier entertainment and celebrity memorabilia auction house worldwide.  Previous auctions include the collections of Cher, U2, Barbara Streisand, estate of Marilyn Monroe, the estate of Les Paul, Bette Midler and many more. Official website is www.juliensauctions.com or go to www.facebook.com/juliensauctions.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Classical

Monday Music Round Up- 10/27

The Martin Guitar Blog - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:31

Ed Sheeran On The Cover of Acoustic Guitar

Martin Ambassador Ed Sheeran appears on the cover of the December issue of Acoustic Guitar. You can purchase a digital version of the issue here.

acousticguitar_ed

The 2015 Easy Livin' Snowboard In Stores

The new Burton Easy Livin' Snowboard designed by Martin Ambassador Danny Davis is now in stores. When talking about the collaboration Danny says, "the Burton Easy Livin' x Martin Guitar snowboard has become my favorite board that I've ever ridden." To get me info on the snowboard, click here.

MartinGuitar_Twitter-1

Ben Howard Releases New Album

Martin Ambassador Ben Howard released his new album I Forget Where We Were last week. The album has been getting rave reviews! If you haven't downloaded it yet, you can do so here.

benhoward

Want To Meet Hunter Hayes?

Martin Ambassador Hunter Hayes teamed up with Rowl to give you a chance to win VIP tickets & a chance to meet Hunter during his Tattoo Your Name Tour! To enter, download the Rowl App and follow Hunter. Get more info about the sweepstakes here.

hunter_tattoo

Categories: Manufacturers

The Best Wood, Part 2

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 10:58
Federico Sheppard: Do you ever use cedar tops?

Antonio Marin: Yes, but only two or three per year. This is a spruce town.


From an interview with the great Granada guitar maker, Antonio Marin, American Lutherie #117



A young man visited my studio the other day to chose a guitar from my inventory, he was looking to replace the Asturias brand guitar that he is currently playing. His two complaints about the Asturias were the string length (656mm) and the neck is too thick and rounded.



Spruce/Walnut Guitar


I handed him a spruce/walnut guitar (photo above) with a scale length of 650mm. He loved the neck and the string length, but I noticed right away that he was struggling to get a good sound out of it.




Spruce/California Laurel guitar, Torres/Santos Model

So, I pulled out one of my latest guitars, the one based upon Antonio Torres's guitar FE 19, which is loud, has an amazing voice and capable of many nuances and again, as he played this guitar I noticed that he didn't get along with it.

"Wilson," he said, "I really want to play that Douglas fir/mahogany guitar that you brought to the Guitar Celebration at Metro State."





I got that guitar out of its case and handed it to him.

It was startling to hear him play that guitar, it was clear that a spruce topped guitar was not for him. The piece of music that he played was immediately clearer in sound and quality, no flubs with the left or right hand.

This guitar has a 640mm string length, one-half inch shorter then his Asturias, which he noticed right away and mentioned that the neck on my guitar made it easier from him to play.

For a little experiment, I let him play my old battle axe, a cedar top Hernandis guitar with a 665mm string length that was made in Japan in 1973 and imported by Sherry-Brener, the one that I played at the Christopher Parkening master class (click here for my posting on that) all those years ago. Yep, he could play that guitar well and it turned out that his Asturias guitar has a cedar top.

I told him that at this point in his studies he is a Douglas fir and cedar man.

I never would have thought that wood could influence a classical guitar player that much.




A true Spanish guitar is made of spruce and rosewood, like the woods in the photo above. I strive to make as Spanish of a guitar that I can, even though I am not Spanish, I want to capture that sound I heard in Segovia's and Sabicas' recording when I was studying the classical guitar.

Working with these young musicians is showing me that I need to make instruments that fit them, that fit them physically, sonically and dare I say it, emotionally. The guitar they play should blow their minds so much that they can't stop playing it and through that constant playing they become better musicians. That is a goal worth working for.

The young man will come back next weekend to pay for and take delivery on the Douglas fir/mahogany guitar. He mentioned to me that he wants me to make him a guitar for his senior recital, which will be in one year.

I all ready know what woods I will use for that guitar: a Douglas fir top; black walnut back and sides; walnut for the neck; black locust for the fret board and bridge; and braced with Engelmann spruce.

All woods that grow in Colorado.


Douglas fir that was salvaged from an old bleacher seat. I've had this piece for 15 years

Time for me to go have lunch and get into the workshop and do some work!


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by Dr. Radut